In 1937, in the garage of a duplex at 367 Addison Avenue in Palo Alto, two of Frederick Terman’s students, William Hewlett and David Packard, formed a partnership and began manufacturing an audio-oscillator, an instrument that generates pure tones at specified frequencies. Hewlett had designed the machine at Stanford, for his PhD thesis in engineering. As a tool for measuring audio frequencies, it was useful in the production and maintenance of radios, telephones, and other audio devices. Walt Disney purchased one of the first of devices built in the garage, and used it in the production of the classic animated film, Fantasia. In 1939, the partners formally incorporated the Hewlett-Packard Company, which went on to become an astonishing commercial success, a household name in American business and consumer culture, and an anchor for the development of high technologies in Silicon Valley.

367 Addison Avenue, Palo Alto, the "Birthplace of Silicon Valley."

367 Addison Avenue, Palo Alto, the "Birthplace of Silicon Valley."

Fantasia  (1940), a Walt Disney Company production.

Fantasia (1940), a Walt Disney Company production.